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Acrocorinth, A hike around the top
William Stewart  ~  June 22, 2016  

Corinth, ancient Greek city of the Corinthian helmet, the Corinthian column, and long a pivotal and strategic city lies at the gateway to the Peloponnese. The ancient city has much to marvel at and a history that takes time to fully appreciate. It has seen many peoples, from the Mycenaeans, the Ancient Greeks, Romans (who would both destroy and later rebuild it), early Christians, the Venetians and the Ottomans, with even the Germans in WWII taking possession of it. Acrocorinth is the acropolis that lies above the ancient city, a fortified hilltop that has been active and maintained as such throughout this entire history, with walls and fortifications from all of these times.

From the ancient city of Corinth, this is the road the lead down to the old port. In the distance, the acropolis.

From the ancient city of Corinth, this is the road the lead down to the old port. In the distance, the acropolis.

Practical Information
Firstly, the hike is not a designated route, but rather a wander around the fortifications. The walls themselves can be traversed, with sections you can both walk on, and walk beside, mostly on a reasonable path. The walls are about 3kms long, and take in the fortified towers and other defensive structures. I took about 2 hrs to wander around, and that seemed enough. You could extend the walk further, and walk up (or down) from Ancient Corinth. Hours need to be watched though, currently Acrocorinth opens 8:45, closes 15:00, inc. summer. Ancient Corinth is open until 20:00 in summer.

Acrocorinth-Map



The Hike

The first of the three gates that take you within. This is the most vulnerable part of the hilltop, so the most strongly fortified, and used as the main entrance.

The first of the three gates that take you within. This is the most vulnerable part of the hilltop, so the most strongly fortified, and used as the main entrance.

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A building, not sure what it was, but it looked like a mosque on the inside, so possibly from the Ottoman occupation?

A building, not sure what it was, but it looked like a mosque on the inside, so possibly from the Ottoman occupation?

The highest point of the hilltop, has variously been marked with a Temple of Aphrodite, a Christian (Orthodox and Catholic) chapel and an Ottoman built Mosque. Perhaps it is fitting for our secular society today, that all that remains is the various ruins of its past.

The highest point of the hilltop, has variously been marked with a Temple of Aphrodite, a Christian (Orthodox and Catholic) chapel and an Ottoman built Mosque. Perhaps it is fitting for our secular society today, that all that remains is the various ruins of its past.

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A cistern for storing water on the southern side of the acropolis

A cistern for storing water on the southern side of the acropolis

Stairs lead down to the cistern.

Stairs lead down to the cistern.

One of the fortified corners of the 3rd layer of walls around the gates.

One of the fortified corners of the 3rd layer of walls around the gates.

Embedded within the tower, an old column has been used instead of bricks.

Embedded within the tower, an old column has been used instead of bricks.

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